These Archaelogical Sites Might be Gone in the Next Few Years

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Archaeologists often find ancient places that the public is allowed to visit. However, these sites are slowly disappearing and you may not be able to see them if you wait too long.
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Altai Mountains Burial Grounds

Dating back about 2,500 years, these ancient burial grounds are threatened by the melting of the permafrost in the area.
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Chinguetti

This city dates back to the 13th century, but sandstorms are causing damage and erosion.
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Turtle Mound

Once the home to a tribe of Native Americans, but erosion, rising sea levels and storms are doing away with the area.
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Mesa Verde

These Native American cliff dwellings are being slowly destroyed by rising temperatures and lowered precipitation levels, as well as flooding and erosion.
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Historic Jamestown

One of the first American settlements, historic Jamestown was recently damaged by Hurricane Isabel and future weather could make it worse.
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Chan Chan

This ancient Peruvian city has tons of history, but extreme temperatures in the area could leave the city completely obliberated in the next few years.
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Chinchorro Mummies

The mummies of this ancient fishing culture are slowly being destroyed by humidity inside and outside.
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Aboriginal Rock Art

These ancient works of art are falling prey to vandals, animals and development in the area.
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Island of Meroe

Located in Sudan, this place was the capital of the kingdom of Kush, but Saharan sands are slowly eroding the city.
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Walakpa Bay

This Alaskan landmark is threatended by thawing, coastal storms and rising sea levels.
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