Inside The Park Home Run Record Holders

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One of the rarest (and most exciting) plays in baseball, the Inside The Park Home Run (ITPHR) has a long history, with most being hit at a time when stadiums had no outfield fence. Now that the walls are up, the play is even more rare. That’s what makes it so memorable. Even so, some players have achieved baseball immortality with the ITPHR. These 9 are for the record books…
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Johnnie LeMaster

On September 2, 1975, in his first MLB at-bat, Johnnie LeMaster hit an inside the park home run for the San Francisco Giants. It had been done only once before, by the Cardinals’ Luke Stuart, in August, 1921.
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Greg Gagne

Most ITPHRs in one game: On October 4, 1986, Greg Gagne of the Minnesota Twins, hit two ITPHRs in one game, setting the Modern Day (30-year) record.
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Dick Allen

On July 31, 1972, Dick Allen, of the Chicago White Sox, hit 2 ITPHRs in one game, setting the Postmodern Day (50-year) record.
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Ty Cobb

In 1909, Detroit’s Ty Cobb set the single season AL record for ITPHRs, beating out 9 throws to the plate.
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Sam Crawford

In 1901, Cincy’s Sam Crawford legged out 12 ITPHRs, setting the single season NL record.
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Casey Stengel

On May 1, 1913, Casey Stengel hustled out 2 ITHPRs for the Brooklyn Dodgers against the rival NL team, the NY Giants. The next day, in response to the jeering of the opposing fans, Stengel pulled his famous “Bird-In-A-Hat” trick, for which he became even more famous.
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Ty Cobb

The legendary Ty Cobb holds the American League record (among many others) for most ITPHRs. He hit 46 in his career, all with the Detroit Tigers.
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Tommy Leach

Tommy Leach holds the career ITPHR National League record, with 48 total, playing for 3 different teams.
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Jesse Burkett

Jesse Burkett is the King of the ITPHR list, running out 55 dingers over a 20+ year career playing for 5 teams in both the NL and AL. Those were the days…
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